Has Anyone Ever Lost a No-Hitter?

A no-hitter is a legendary feat for a pitcher, but it is a rare occurrence in Major League Baseball (MLB). In the history of MLB, there have been 300 official no-hitters, but there have been instances where a pitcher has come close to achieving the feat, only to have it taken away in the late innings. So, has anyone ever lost a no-hitter? The answer is yes.

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What Is a No-Hitter?

A no-hitter is a game in which a pitcher does not allow any hits. This means that the opposing team is unable to record a single hit over the course of a full nine innings. A perfect game is the same concept but is even rarer, as it requires the pitcher to not allow a single baserunner.

No-Hitters Lost in the Late Innings

When a pitcher is on the verge of a no-hitter, the game is often referred to as a “no-no”, and the pitcher is said to be “working on a no-hitter”. While a no-hitter is incredibly rare, it is not unheard of for a pitcher to come within one or two outs of completing a no-hitter before it is taken away in the late innings.

There have been a few instances in MLB history where a pitcher has come within one out of a no-hitter, only to have it taken away by a single hit.

The Most Recent Instance of a No-Hitter Lost

The most recent instance of a no-hitter lost was in September of 2019 when San Francisco Giants’ pitcher Shaun Anderson was on the brink of pitching a no-hitter against the Arizona Diamondbacks. Anderson had retired the first 26 batters he faced and was one out away from a no-hitter when he allowed a single to Diamondbacks’ hitter Ketel Marte.

The Most Famous Instance of a No-Hitter Lost

The most famous instance of a no-hitter lost was in May of 2012 when Detroit Tigers’ pitcher Armando Galarraga was on the brink of pitching a perfect game against the Cleveland Indians. Galarraga had retired 26 straight batters and was one out away from a perfect game when he allowed a single to Indians’ hitter Jason Donald.

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However, the single was ruled an infield hit by umpire Jim Joyce, even though replays showed that Galarraga had beaten Donald to the bag. While the single took away the perfect game, Galarraga was still credited with a no-hitter.

The Other Instances of a No-Hitter Lost

There have been several other instances in MLB history where a pitcher has come within one out of a no-hitter, only to have it taken away in the late innings. In 1987, San Diego Padres’ pitcher Ed Whitson came within one out of a no-hitter against the Pittsburgh Pirates, only to have it taken away by a single by Pirates’ hitter Steve Kemp.

In 1988, Oakland Athletics’ pitcher Dave Stewart came within one out of a no-hitter against the Toronto Blue Jays, only to have it taken away by a single by Blue Jays’ hitter Junior Felix. In 1989, San Francisco Giants’ pitcher Scott Garrelts came within one out of a no-hitter against the Los Angeles Dodgers, only to have it taken away by a single by Dodgers’ hitter Dave Anderson.

Conclusion

In conclusion, while a no-hitter is a rare feat in MLB, it is not unheard of for a pitcher to come within one or two outs of a no-hitter before it is taken away in the late innings. The most recent instance of a no-hitter lost was in September of 2019, when San Francisco Giants’ pitcher Shaun Anderson was one out away from a no-hitter before he allowed a single to Arizona Diamondbacks’ hitter Ketel Marte. The most famous instance of a no-hitter lost was in May of 2012 when Detroit Tigers’ pitcher Armando Galarraga was one out away from a perfect game before he allowed a single to Cleveland Indians’ hitter Jason Donald. There have been several other instances in MLB history where a pitcher has come within one out of a no-hitter, only to have it taken away in the late innings.